Apr. 8th, 2017

bunnyfeather: (flamdrink)

The item is rather ornate.  The heads protruding are those of the deities presiding over the eight days of the Roman week, four on either side, followed by the head of a bull, and ending in a lion head; the heads at the top are perhaps Cybele and Attis, each on the head of a horse.

The item is perhaps 2-3rd century, and probably made in Rome or Italy.  One of the arms was broken and mended in antiquity, indicating hard usage.

The clamps were used to prevent blood loss, and the actual cutting was done by a knife.




Unrelated:  Greek historian Herodotus wrote that if a cat died in an Egyptian household, the inhabitants would shave their eyebrows!
bunnyfeather: (flamdrink)
excerpts:

  1. The 1st century AD Roman poet Martial wrote a poem about a woman picking her wedgie.

  2. Nudity among the Romans was more taboo than in the Greek world, so sometimes nudity was used to distinguish among the social classes. Roman citizens appeared in their togas, whereas gladiators, slaves, and other “indecent” individuals were often depicted in art and literature as fully or semi-nude.

  3. In day-to-day life, Roman men did not have a choice between boxers or briefs.  They mostly went commando.

  4. Ancient Roman women strove to meet the body ideal of the time: slender, with small breasts and large hips. A breastband (strophium) similar to a bandeau top was used to bind breasts, and according to historical records, reputable women kept the breastbands on during sex, to the dismay of their husbands.

  5. Leather bikini briefs made out of waterproof goatskin may have been especially useful during menstruation. Rags were commonly used by Roman women to absorb menstrual blood, and the leather bikinis probably accommodated these rags. Both men and women seem to have preferred leather apparel for exercising.

Ancient Roman Leather Underwear
full article with illustrations

The Argo

Apr. 8th, 2017 01:52 pm
bunnyfeather: (flamdrink)
Spectacular reconstruction of the penteconter, the Argo, immortalized by Apollonius of Rhodes in his poem of Jason & the Argonauts

bunnyfeather: (flamdrink)
He makes me get up and dance and I am in love.  <3 <3 <3
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