bunnyfeather: (flamdrink)
[personal profile] bunnyfeather
An ex-voto is created when an individual's prayers for a miracle are answered. After praying to a saint for a miraculous healing, an individual would commission a local artist to create a small painting that would be hung in the local church as a public testimony of that individual's faith and gratitude for a miracle. Usually done on canvas or tin, ex-votos generally consist of three basic elements: the illustrative depiction of the event, the narrative, and the depiction of the saint or deity.
















There are so many more

source

Date: 2017-03-15 10:23 pm (UTC)
gracegiver: (Default)
From: [personal profile] gracegiver
They hung these in churches? What a trip.
Crazy stuff.
Religion really is demented.

Date: 2017-03-15 10:35 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] retrofire.livejournal.com
Religion is demented. Amen sista! lol These are bizarre - they are fascinating to me as works of primitive art - like inappropriate illustrations for children's books.

"This tradition originated in Italy in the 15th century when wealthy patrons commissioned artists to compose a visual representation of miracles they had been granted or hoped for. According to a patron’s wealth, the painting would then be hung in a church, private chapel, or home. When the tradition spread to the less wealthy, it fell out of fashion with the upper classes. In the early part of the colonial period it spread to Europe, eventually to Latin America, reaching its height in Mexico during the middle of the nineteenth century."
http://www.mariolinasalvatori.com/understanding-ex-votos/

It was also a class thing. Weird.

Date: 2017-03-16 04:14 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] duccio.livejournal.com
In the Mission Church at Capistrano, which I visited in 1988, there was a side chapel about 15x25 feet dedicated to exvotos given to all the people who had cancer. The tin paintings were all about post card size, up to about 8x10, and there must have been a thousand of them. The three walls were covered with them from about a foot off the floor to about 12 feet up the walls. The actually slightly overlapped each other being of irregular sizes. The room was dimly lit, with one smallish window high up, and a candle lit altar beneath the window. The candles caused the air to slightly affect the lungs, making the experience seem personal. It was kind of an emotional experience being in this enclosure with all of these real mementos of cancer survivors, patients, and the deceased, with the very hushed, vacationing tourists wandering around reading the various included written bits below each picture.

Date: 2017-03-16 04:35 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] retrofire.livejournal.com
Thank you for sharing your experience. They seem to be intimate communications - very personal stories, but surreal to the point where I imagine them collected into a child's golden book to warn about being careful and things to avoid. Must be it's hard for me to accept and understand the reality of these, I just can't accept these as anything other than bizarre. I wonder how I would have reacted if I had seen them in person, in situ, as you had.

Date: 2017-03-16 04:01 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] duccio.livejournal.com
I have a few of these on tin. I got them from eBay. They have a lot of them, but mostly they are new ones, but being new, they are often about prayers for odd stuff like someone being cured from being gay, or a drunken, battering husband falling into pigsty and getting nose bitten off, which miraculously is sewn back on and he returns to bully his family (lucky wife, huh), or somebody in a taxi that catches fire... all kinds of almost ordinary contemporary events.

This one is very nice: bright and clear.

There are some moving ones of sick people in bed and others of people falling in love. One I have is of a man praying to a portrait of St Francis. It's folk arty commercial, but rather nicely painted in a Titian sort of style - about 5x3.5". Another is an artillery battle scene during an Emperor Maximilian era campaign in Mexico: I think the Thanks to the Saint was that the guerrillas being fired upon were saved by being over shot because of a hilly terrain. It's about 8x10". I had another one which I may have given to a buddy of mine. It was of somebody having a problem on a roller coaster - my friend and I used to be in a roller coaster club and go on trips to ride coasters out here on the west coast.

Date: 2017-03-16 04:44 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] retrofire.livejournal.com
Some of the stories are funny - maybe that's it - they call up a very macabre sense of humor. Imagine a book of these showcasing the most odd. A picture book for adults. We'd all be laughing at the frailties of the human condition. Imagine a test group of people looking at these and trying to pick the funniest ones. Many years ago I called my dark side "black spaghetti." Interesting to be reminded of that.

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